blatant-lies

A description of the Legislative Process in the United States

July 12th, 2010  |  Published in blatant-lies, legislation

I have made a small writeup, with some images, of the basic steps of how laws get made in the USA.

http://www.meronoiac.com/infographics/laws/

This uses Processing.js (for no good reason, really), which uses HTML5 Canvas elements, which won't work in IE I don't believe.

The functions of various regions of the human brain.

March 29th, 2010  |  Published in blatant-lies

I have compiled, from a number of reputable neuroscience texts, information on what we know about the functions of various parts of the human brain and visualized this information in a (hopefully very useful) graphical representation:

http://www.meronoiac.com/infographics/brain/

This uses HTML5 canvas elements, so won't work in IE. Also it doesn't work on mobile Safari, annoyingly enough.

The Distribution of Various Quantities Across the Contiguous United States

March 22nd, 2010  |  Published in blatant-lies

I have painstakingly compiled and plotted various interesting statistics about the distribution of various quantities across the inhabitants of the 48 contiguous United States (sorry Hawaii and Alaska, but you ruin just about every visualization you touch):

http://www.meronoiac.com/infographics/americandistributions/

This was made with Processsing.js, and so uses HTML 5 canvases -- it therefore won't work on IE or older browsers.

An Etymology of the word "Fuck"

March 14th, 2010  |  Published in blatant-lies

At last, my months of philological toil bear fruit, with this informative infographic describing the etymology of the most obscene word in the English language, "fuck". I am, as far as I know, the first to be able to successfully trace the word back to the original Proto-Indo-European, and subsequently trace the term back down a few branches of the well-known Indo-European language tree. I really am quite excited to be able to present my research for you here:

http://www.meronoiac.com/infographics/etymtree/

This was made with the extremely-neat Processing.js library, and uses HTML5 Canvases (and so won't work in IE. Also, it doesn't work on mobile Safari right now, heh).

I hope you enjoy my exciting new etymological discoveries.